Round-ups by Indie Devs

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12 Tricks to Selling Your Ideas, Your Game & Yourself by Thomas Henshell

“In order to sell well, you must have conviction. You have conviction if you truly believe in yourself and your product. While I must admit it is possible for the highly skilled to fake conviction, there is no need to do so. Real conviction is easy and free when you are in love with your product.”

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Wulverblade at GDC 2014

“Since the event we have had continued interest in the game which has been really heartening to see. We now realize that we should do everything we can to continue to grow that interest and keep the attention going.”

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City of the Shrowd at PlayExpo 2015

“Book hotels, order materials sooner: this cost a good deal of money and was quite stressful to boot. I wasn’t sure if we would be able to commit to attending until closer to the show, but as a result, lodging costs went way up, and selection went way down.”

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SmuggleCraft at Indy PopCon 2015

“Now, let’s get to the important part: everyone loved The Couch. […] We added colorful throw pillows and a blanket because we felt it was important for our booth to feel like home; to hearken back to couch-centric local multiplayer days. It brought an element of comfort to gameplay that is uncommon at convention booths, and we had a number of visitors return all weekend to duke it out with their friends on The Couch.”

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Modsork at 6 Expos in 6 Months

“MODSORK is a challenging arcade game: Having a publicly visible leaderboard has proven quite effective in attracting competitive players and even sparked a friendly rivalry or two. People would get on it, then walk past later and see their score had been surpassed, which motivated them to have another go. It also provided a photo/selfie opportunity for folks who had just beaten the highscore.”

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One Shot at GDC’s 2016 Indie Megabooth

“We very early on realized that our demo was too long for a convention setting. The demo could take a new player 30+ minutes to complete without aid. Many early players didn’t stick around for the entire demo not surprisingly.”

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How to Pitch & Sell Your Game at a Con by Thomas Henshell

“With the context established and the scaffolding of a why in place to support it, the next part is to tell the audience something about the game that amazes them and makes them want it. You want to light off a mini-nuke in their imagination and blow their mind.”

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On the importance of showing gameplay video when demoing your Gear VR game by Jonathan Daley

“But the amazing thing was when someone had the Gear VR on and was playing the game; then the video took on a whole other paradigm. Whenever someone came up to the booth while someone was playing our game, they would assume the video they were watching was of live gameplay.”

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How to bring your game to the Gamescom – a MEGABOOTH diary by Jana Reinhardt

“My learning: don’t do the press work two weeks before the Gamescom as most journos will already be booked with appointments. Although I’m super-happy with the response this time and that most of the invited journalists at least agreed on coming by if they found some time. Starting everything earlier is my big goal for the next convention, now that I have so many contacts readily collected.”

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Tips For Devs: Getting The Most Out Of A Convention (Part 2)

“Fun Fact: I’ve purchased titles and/or visited booths every year because they dropped flyers off at the Media/Press room.”

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