Round-ups by Indie Devs

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9 Tips for Showcasing at Events by Andreea Vaduva

“Showcasing at events can get a bit expensive, especially if you have to travel by plane. So, as an indie developer, we are entitled to ask ourselves why would we invest in events, when we could pour that money in online advertising? Here are a few key areas that an event covers and turn useful in various stages of your business, that online doesn’t cover:”

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Poncho at EGX 2015

“I was furious, after spending just as much money as everyone else, we got far less value. To top it off, our booth alone was dark and had no lighting. In order to get press to play the game, we literally had to go out into the expo and grab as much press as we could and lead them to our own booth, because no one knew where it was. Additionally, due to the lighting situation, some press that wanted to conduct interviews couldn’t do it in front of our booth because it was too dark. That’s how bad it was.”

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Ysbryd at PAX East 2015

“We actually didn’t have any sort of Ysbryd Games branding visible, other than subtle, small logos attached to each of the various games’ banners. This was a big mistake on our part, much as we believed that it was better to help push the identity of our devs’ games. A lot of people believed our area was still part of the Indie Megabooth – which theoretically isn’t a bad thing (we love you, guys!), but this just means we have a long way to go with establishing our label as a proper brand.”

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The 5 trends that defined the game industry in 2016 by Gamasutra

“2016 was the year that these fears and gut feelings began to creep into observable reality: As the quality bar rises on indie games, so do development costs; discoverability continues to be an issue as games flood the market; hits become bigger and fewer, squeezing out more indies; game devs have more and more in common with struggling artists and musicians; and so on.”

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Through the Woods at PAX Prime 2015

“Make sure there are at least three of you so one of you can always be walking around, networking and making new friends! Meet everyone! Play every game, even if it doesn’t look that interesting to you; you might be surprised.”

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How we increased our number of subscribers by 150% at MAGFEST

“One of the biggest mistakes we could have made would have been to show off an unfinished project. Using resources such as r/gamedev and consultants like Xelnath (Alexander Brazie)., we tested and retested our demo. After 8 months of gathering feedback, we created a strong well-balanced set of levels that delivers a lot of action in a very short time.”

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Epistory at PAX South 2016

“We had a very basic booth and wanted to put our own little touch on it. We brought a roll up of Epistory and built a fox face-like paper bowl, with candies in it. I confess that it’s easier to find ideas when your game has a papercraft/origami art style like ours! We also placed flyers on the table with a nice design and bookmark shape to remind players of the storybook written in the game. The final touch was a homemade fox mask that looked exactly like the one that our protagonist is riding. Sometimes we wore it, sometimes we let people try it.”

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Five Awesome Hacks for Exhibiting your Indie Game at PAX or GDC

“Binder clips, to the indie game convention exhibitor, are like rolls of duct tape to a handyman: an incredibly useful and versatile secret weapon that you’ll find yourself using over and over for unexpected reasons. In a sea of lousy office supplies that break, fail, and ruin things, binder clips are (for lack of a better descriptor), a F#^$ING GODSEND.”

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Reassembly at PAX Prime 2014

“On the show floor, explaining the game succinctly over and over again and watching people’s reactions completely changed how I though about the game myself. Many things I thought of as core features turned out to be irreverent or too complex to explain, and things I thought of as trivialities turned out to be very significant to people. It is very easy to completely loose perspective on a project and showing it to new people is the solution.”

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Arelite Core at PAX East 2016

“I like to arrive early to various events, which is why I made sure I was always there early during the three days of the convention. I found that it was a good time to meet with people I otherwise wouldn’t have time to, and have given some business cards during that time. You never know when opportunities will arise, and I do feel that being present early in that way can give a leg up on other devs. And if not, it’s just a great occasion to mingle with your fellows, which is tougher to do later on”

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